Configuring other e-mail clients

Unfortunately, WDY Enterprises has finite resources to provide technical documentation and support. We regret that we can document, test, and thus assure functionality with a limited number of well-known and understood platforms and packages. Any system not documented by WDY Enterprises (including contributed documentation from our users) is considered unsupported. While we are confident that in most cases, it is possible to make such systems work, we can not provide that assistance at no charge.

 

However, if you use an alternative platform, we can and will provide you with the technical specifications of our services, so that you can work out how to do things on your own or you can bring us in to resolve the issue for you for a reasonable charge.

 

Generally, we recommend the use of encrypted protocol options for all email communications as a security/privacy protection measure.

 
Protocol Address:Port Transmission Protocol Description
Submit wdyllc.com:587 The Submit Protocol is an implementation of SMTP which is used to transmit e-mail when you send an e-mail message. To use this protocol, your client must authenticate by providing a valid username and password to the Submit server prior to being able to send mail. This service can optionally utilize the STARTTLS option ("use encryption" or "use a secure connection" are common phrases attached to this configuration option).

Protocol Address:Port Retrieval Protocol Description
POP3 wdyllc.com:110 The Post Office Protocol (version 3) is a simple Internet e-mail retrieval protocol. We provide this mechanism as the "least common denominator" method to retrieve e-mail for our clients.

POP3S wdyllc.com:995 This is a secured Post Office Protocol (version 3). It is the same, simple Internet e-mail retrieval protocol, but it runs over an encrypted, secure sockets layer connection (SSL) to protect the confidentialiy and integrity of your e-mail communications.

IMAP wdyllc.com:143 This is an Internet Message Access Protocol connection. IMAP enhances the e-mail experience by maintaining and storing your e-mail in one or more folders on the server. The big downside to IMAP (and the reason why we do not document it as the default method to access your e-mail) is that everything you store on the server counts against the total disk storage specified in your user agreement. If you run beyond your allocated space, your e-mail may not function as you expect, because the server will not permit you to go beyond your contracted allocation. This means that if you do not dilligently manage your e-mail storage by removing old messages, the system may refuse to accept more e-mail for your account. Our webmail interface uses IMAP to access your e-mail.

IMAPS wdyllc.com:993 This is a secured Internet Message Access Protocol connection. It is a much more complicated Internet e-mail retrieval protocol which runs over an encrypted, secure sockets layer connection (SSL) to protect the confidentiality and integrity of your e-mail communications. IMAPS enhances the e-mail experience by maintaining and storing your e-mail in one or more folders on the server. The big downside to IMASP (and the reason why we do not document it as the default method to access your e-mail) is that everything you store on the server counts against the total disk storage specified in your user agreement. If you run beyond your allocated space, your e-mail may not function as you expect, because the server will not permit you to go beyond your contracted allocation. This means that if you do not dilligently manage your e-mail storage by removing old messages, the system may refuse to accept more e-mail for your account.

One common "gotcha" is the improper specification of usernames and e-mail addresses. Assuming that your e-mail address is USER@DOMAIN, your username is USER within your e-mail program.

 

Another known issue is that some e-mail products that do not act as their configuration options specify. For instance, some programs will offer a "requires encryption" setting, and then send unencrypted traffic that contravenes the published protocol, or will send only some of the traffic encrypted. This problem is more pronounced in more complicated protocols (IMAP and the SMTP family) but has been observed in all e-mail protocols offered by WDYLLC systems. In these cases, once we identify that the client is not behaving as configured, we have to refer the problem back to the software vendor for resolution. WDY Enterprises no longer recommends Microsoft Outlook or Outlook Express in part because of this issue.

 

Finally, some users may ask about (E)SMTP. We do support SMTP/ESMTP (with TLS) for server-to-server communication, but do not support users sending email directly to our servers with these protocols. Most wifi hotspots and many Internet connectivity providers (including a number of cellular carriers) block (E)SMTP on the server-to-server ports, and that's a widely accepted security measure used to reduce spam volumes. The ecosystem now requires the Submit protocol for client-to-server email transmission.